Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Bonner County Lakes Commission

Bonner County Lakes Commission Updates

The spring refill of Lake Pend Oreille begins today, April 1. The planned operation for April is to target a lake elevation of approximately 2055 ft by the end of the month. The day-to-day rate of refill will vary based on changing inflows to Lake Pend Oreille. This week, the elevation of Lake Pend Oreille is expected to increase gradually within the 2052-2053 ft range.


Albeni Falls operations during May and June will be set according to observed and forecast conditions in order to manage flood risk. The Corps monitors snowpack and weather forecasts to determine timing to reach the summer operating range of 2062.0 to 2062.5 ft. In a typical non-flood year this summer range is reached in mid to late June. The current seasonal water supply forecast for April-July inflow volume is 88% of average.

Short term modeling forecasts are provided by the Northwest River Forecast Center.  Their projections for Albeni Falls Dam inflow, outflow, and the elevation of Lake Pend Oreille at the Hope gage can be found here:


Projections for future operations at Albeni Falls Dam can be found here:



Bonner County Lakes Commission
email: lakescommission@gmail.com 
website: 
lakes-commission.com

Friday, March 26, 2021

It's Here! Corsair Pulse 600

The first Corsair Pulse 600 ever in the Inland Northwest has arrived... It is here and ready for interested parties to go on a demo sail. Email us (funtosail@gmail.com) to secure your time to demo this amazing family friendly but high performance sailboat...



Thursday, March 25, 2021

Safe Boating CdA

       200 W. Hanley Ave. in Coeur d’Alene



Remember to wear a life jacket to the first day of the event and encourage everyone to wear them to work, etc. as May 21 is National Wear Your Lifejacket to Work Day!

LEARN ABOUT SAFE BOATING AT THIS ANNUAL EVENT! ATTENDED BY SHERIFF MARINE DEPARTMENTS FROM KOOTENAI & SPOKANE COUNTIES, US COAST GUARD, AND STATE AGENCIES. 


SUPPORT SAFE BOATING IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST BY BECOMING A SPONSOR/DONOR &/OR VOLUNTEERINGS. Email us at accesstooutdoors@gmail.com to learn more.




Monday, March 22, 2021

11 Things Recreational Boaters Should Know

Kootenai County leads all counties in Idaho with the most registered vessels, followed by Bonner County (Lake Pend Oreille). Spokane County leads all counties in Eastern WA with the most registered boats. And Flathead County has the most boats registered in Montana. On top of that these areas have a large non motorized boating and water enthusiast population. With many boats register and active non-motorized enthusiasts comes with more boating accidents and drownings. Not to mention the Inland Northwest is a boating paradise with its vast marine environments of small and large lakes/reservoirs and many rivers. All this combined creates a unique and daunting challenge for marine law enforcement. Sheriff Marine divisions of the Inland NW asks all marine enthusiasts to make a difference in prevent recreational marine accidents. Here are 10 things you can do to accomplish this...

1.     Accident Reporting

Federal law requires the operator or owner of a recreational vessel to file a boating accident report with the State reporting authority if the recreational vessel is involved in an accident that results in any of the following:

·     A person dies

·     A person is injured and requires medical treatment beyond first aid

·     A  person disappears from the vessel under circumstances that indicate death or injury

·     Damage to vessels and other property totals $2,000 (lower amounts in some states and territories) 

·     The boat is destroyed

2.     Boater Education (email FunToSAIL for more info)

Boating safety courses are offered for all types and ages of recreational boaters. These courses are conducted by qualified volunteer organizations, such as the The Sheriff Marine Divisions, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, U.S. Power Squadron, and other sponsors including state boating agencies. FunToSAIL.com offers sailing lessons for those interested in learning to sail small daysailors such as Hobie Cats to coastal sailing for keelboaters/multihullers.

3.     Vessel Safety Check

Both the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and the United States Power Squadrons have certified vessel examiners who will perform a free Vessel Safety Check ("VSC") at your boat, at a time of mutual convenience.

4.     Life Jackets

Most boating-related drownings happen on nice days. The U.S. Coast Guard says, “There’s no excuse not to wear a lifejacket on the water.”

5.     Going Paddling

The Paddling.com has education and tips on its website.

6.     Go Sailing

FunToSAIL.com has education and tips via is various sailing classes for those with and without disAbilities.

7.     Float Plans

The U.S. Coast Guard says boaters should file a float plan before embarking on the water. Why? The answer is simple... there are just too many facts that need to be accurately remembered and ultimately conveyed in an emergency situation. Without a float plan, you are counting on someone else, a friend, neighbor, or family member to remember detailed information that rescue personnel needs in order to find you. Information can make a difference in the outcome.

8.     Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide (CO) can harm and even kill you inside or outside your boat. The U.S. Coast Guard urges boaters to educate themselves about the dangers of carbon monoxide.

9.     Boating Under the Influence (BUI)

BUI is just as dangerous as driving under the influence (DUI). The leading contributing factor in fatal boating accidents is alcohol. Alcohol and water do not mix.

10.     Shallow Water Boat Performance

Boats designed for shallow water fishing or recreational use are most prone to shallow water accidents, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. These boaters need to know how to handle this situation before going out on the water.

11.     Propeller Safety

Boat propellers are a hidden danger to boaters. To avoid boat propeller accidents remove keys from the ignition when stopping. Make sure your motor safety lanyard is attacked to the safety off switch and is attached to the skipper/person who is driving the boat.

CONCLUSION: Doing these 11 things will help you and others to have a safe boating experience. If you see unsafe boaters such as those under the influence of alcohol write down the boats registration number and report to the local marine enforcement (should have this contact info on your float plan and on your boat). Take immediate action if one can do it safely. Do not engage drunk or violent acting individuals/groups. Best to contact law enforcement while on the water via VHF radio safety channel. Cell phone signals are not always reliable while on the water.

Boating accident video... what not to do...

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Thursday, March 4, 2021

12 Meter Yachts


This video shows the beautify of the former 12 meter Americas Cup yachts. A bygone day for the Americas Cup but not today for the 12 meter class. Some think these boats should be brought back to the Americas Cup after recent years of techy boats going for speed versus exciting close quarters match racing... Enjoy the video...

 

Monday, March 1, 2021

April and May Events


With the first day of spring fast approaching on March 20 we have some fun spring events coming. Online you can watch SailGP's first series of races for the year on April 24-25 in Bermuda. In May we have our first Inland NW Sailors club activity, FunToSAIL sailing lessons start, and the first annual Silver Lake Mall National Safe Boating event on 5/21-22 (see calendar

New Coastal Sailing Class


It is finally here, our new
Adventure Coastal Sailing class, designed specifically for sailors who sail shallow draft sailboats up to 27 feet/8.2 meters, and for those wanting to sail bigger coastal cruising sailboats but need the skill first.


Our primary instructor Miles Moore has taught classes like it before but this class is new in the fact it creates a whole new lesson format that specifically targets those people who want to camp sail, or use a small shallow draft sailboat to access areas of coastal environments that are not accessible to larger cruising sailboats. 

Learning more about this class and sign up at this link... Adventure Coastal Sailing 300



Sunday, February 28, 2021

Classic Hobie 16 survives

There is an interesting development in the world of catamaran sailing... the disappearance of in-the-water racing catamaran still in production. Catamarans that do not lift out of the water via hydro foils.

For years the Hobie 16 has been the staple of one-design catamaran racing and recreational sailing, plus is known for its wild ride in strong winds. Other catamaran designs to a slightly or much less degree have had a good showing in race turn out. Many designs have come and gone since the Hobie 16 was introduced (1972-present). From the 1970's in-the-water beach cats has been the ticket for speed and hull flying fun but that all changed with the development of foiling trimarans and catamarans (foilers) such as the Flying Phantom, Nacra 17, or iFly, etc. We have seen many Hobie Cat and Prindle/Nacra models, the Olympic Tornado (replaced by the foiling Nacra 17), and others die over the years, and die more quickly recently due to foiling cats. Production of foiling cats started to appear in 2010, but took off sales and racing wise in 2013 when the Americas Cup was using large foiling cats. This was the nail in the coffin for all in-the-water racing cats other than the Hobie 16.

Recreational cats (not typically used for racing) however have not been affected by foilers because they are low cost and low maintenance boats such as the Hobie Getaway or RS cat, but they are not good for high end racing. Even though Foiling cats are amazing to sail due primarily to their speed, the down side is high cost and maintenance. Building a foiler is a lot like building an airplane and so one should not expect an airplane to cost the same as an hang-glider. Plus hydro foils are like wings that require constant maintenance, if the foils get nicked and/or rough the foil like a wing will not develop good lift.

So why is a 1972 cat design (slight upgrades over the years, particularly in 1996) surviving the modern world of foiling cats? It is four fold, It's the best by far in the surf, great low maintenance recreational sailboat, is an ideal in-the-water racing cat, and exciting to sail. In addition the Hobie 16 has years of promotion and has been the most popular beach catamaran sense its introduction. And interesting to note the Hobie 16 world championships still has the best attendance of any catamaran class.

And one final note the Hobie 16 is the only cat used for accessible/disAbled sailing via adding adaptive wings seats to each side of the boat called Trapseats.

So if you want to enjoy fun racing on a classic catamaran, surf, etc. then Hobie 16 is your cat.

PS: Hobie 16 North Americans Championships. June 6-11, 2021; Ocean Springs YC, Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Click here to learn more!


Inland NW (N ID, E WA, NW MT) Hobie Regatta and Events contact Miles Moore at accesstooutdoors@gmail.com or see FunToSAIL calendar.

Hobie 16 Racing Video


Example of a Foiler/Foiling Cat

Friday, January 29, 2021

Boat Show Sales


BOAT SHOW SALES! It is that time of year again to get boat show season sales. Email or text for details... funtosail@gmail.com or 208-704-4454.

Due to the Spokane Boat Show being cancelled and the Coeur d'Alene Boat Show (only for Hagadone Corp products) being only for powerboats FunToSAIL is doing specials during the boat show season for the month of February.

Attention we now sell Corsair Trimarans and soon iFly foiling catamaran...



We have been selling Hobie Cats for almost 20 years...

Monday, January 25, 2021

Lower and Upper Glidden Lake, Shoshone County, Idaho

 Lower Glidden Lake I believe is the highest lake in elevation that you drive right up to. This lake is absolutely beautiful with heavily forested alpine mountains surrounding the lake. Wildlife abound with brown and black bear (Grizzlies as reported), Elk, Deer, Mountain Lions, a variety of foul, etc. Rainbow and Brook Trout inhabit this lake. Motors are not allowed on this lake, which I'm sure the wildlife appreciate. There is a primitive boat launch. Hiking in this area is, of course, spectacular. This lake is 1600 feet long and 250 to 400 feet wide. Varies from 10 to 20 feet deep.

Upper Glidden Lake is to the south of this Lower Glidden Lake, which is smaller but wider is stunningly beautiful place to hike to and camp at, and is also said to be a good fishing lake. Primitive places to camp are mostly along its north shore, and there is a small trail along the north shore with perhaps one area that would be a good wide camping area. Fish and Game info indicates there is a restroom at this lake, but I was unable to find it. This lake is 1100 feet long and 850 feet wide. Varies from 10 to 30 feet deep.

This is the place to turn right to get to Lower and Upper Glidden Lakes
Directions: Lower Glidden Lake is 12.4 miles from the I90 exit. From I90 take Wallace exit 62 at the city of Wallace, Idaho. Turn north onto Burke Can Creek Rd./NF 7623 (HWY 4), and stay on it almost all the way to the lake. The road to this lake is partly paved and partly gravel. It is not marked nor are there signs giving directions to the lake. As you go up this road stay to the right as you will pass several Y's in the road. Stay on the paved road until it ends at the power station. The road is paved from the highway to the power station, even though the pavement gets rough near its end. Along this road you will pass an impressive old mining facility with large buildings. The road that goes to the lake passes right next to the power station and follows the power lines. The road you turn on get to the lake passes under the power lines. While on the gravel road you will pass over 2 small bridges and another one once you turn onto the road to the lake. The picture below is the view of the spot you will turn to go to the lake. The turn point is not quite at the top of the saddle between mountains. After the power station the road turns to gravel, small boulders, with protruding rocks. This road is best suited only for 4x4 vehicles with good ground clearance. When I went up this road the first time a 4x4 pick up turned around due to the rough road conditions. Maps: View interactive google map below or visit google.com/maps type in GPS coordinates 47.518347, -115.728696
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Dirt/mud parking along lake; PATHS/TRAILS... No developed paths/trails. Wide dirt/mud/gravel area to shoreline. Primitive trail single track dirt/rocky/mud trails around some parts of the lake; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES/SHADE… No accessible restrooms. Shade via trees; DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… No accessible docks/platforms. Single primitive lane dirt/mud launch at about 7% grade. Other points to launch from bank over dirt, rock, mud; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No developed access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments; CAMPING... Primitive Tent camping along shoreline; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Sand/mud/marine vegetation; Terrain: Level to 7% grades and greater into steep hills/mountains over sand/gravel/dirt/mud surfaces; H2O/Water: Water clear. Water temperature in the summer can be around 50 to 60 degrees. No Drinking water available; Environmental Conditions: Short summer season due to high elevation. Most of the years its very cold or covered in snow/ice; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas in town of Wallace, ID.

Additional Info: I would NOT travel on this road in Spring (or winter) due to the unstable road conditions. Once at Lower Glidden Lake (can not drive to Upper Glidden Lake) the road goes Southeast around the east side of the lake, which also takes you to the primitive launch. As indicated previously, Fish and Game maps/info indicate there is a restroom but I was unable to find one. This road will be very hard on any car, and without four wheel drive you most likely WILL get stuck. There are a couple deep ruts in the road. Do not drive a car to this lake!