Sunday, June 26, 2022

Malbec 18 First Summer Sail

Saturday, June 25 was the second time I have sailed my Malbec 18, and first time in the summer. I had 1-5 knots of wind during my sailing class I was teaching from noon to about 3, but then after the class the wind piped up to 7-10 knots while sailing with my wife. I cannot express enough just how well this boat sails in very light to stronger winds. The boat will sail with a whisper of wind and handle stronger winds as well.

The boat is easy to rig, taking my time it only takes 20 minutes are so. Less rigging time means more sailing time.

Part of the plan is to use my boat as a RV for camping, a Recreational Vessel (RV). We will be doing several trips soon and will post those experience here. So, stay tuned for more.



 

Wednesday, June 22, 2022

Little Spokane River, Spokane County, Washington

ATTENTION: The St. George’s Put-in on the Little Spokane River is closed due to flooding. “Once the water recedes, we will reopen the area,” said Lara Gricar, a spokeswoman for Washington State Parks and Recreation. Kayakers and other river users can put-in at the Indian Painted Rock trailhead (see map below).


Little Spokane River
The Little Spokane River low access area is about 6 miles northwest of Spokane and is managed as a joint project between the Spokane County Parks and Riverside State Park.

The Little Spokane River Natural Area is a 1,993-acre preserve along a river and todays Rutter Parkway that would otherwise be off-limits to the public. In 1900, the Washington Supreme Court ruled the Little Spokane River to be non-navigable, giving property owners the right to stop public use of the river where it flows through their land. Former Spokane County Parks Director Sam Angove, along with the late river residents Morey and Margaret Haggin and others, secured the natural area for public use in 1985.

The navigate-able portion of Little Spokane River is approximately 7.3 miles long. This river is pretty much the same as it looked hundreds of years ago when the Native Americans used it for hunting and fishing. 

Popular activities on this river include kayaking, canoeing, and fishing. The river is typically slow moving with a max river depth of about 40 feet at its deepest points. It is recommended that when paddling this river, one stays in the middle as there are many areas where branches, etc. hang just above the water (called sweepers) and can potentially sweep you off your craft. This is particularly important during spring runoff when the river is much swifter and colder. Other than during spring runoff or during flash floods and heavy rains the river is slow moving but can still be dangerous especially during the colder times of year.

Doing a paddle trip on this river is either an easy 3.5 mile or 7 mile paddle depending where you put in at. The unique freshwater marsh you will be passing through is home to a wide variety of wildlife such as moose, deer, elk, otter, muskrat, beaver, songbirds, woodpeckers, raptors, and waterfowl. This marsh is important as Great Blue Heron rookery within tall cottonwoods by the riverbanks.

When on a paddling trip here, you know you are coming to the end when you pass under a bridge then see some rapids for the first time. Just before these rapids, to your left is the take-out site. One could paddle through the rapids and follow the river down until it intersects with the Spokane River (do not go through the rapids during spring runoff or late summer or during heavy rains, etc.); then paddle up the Spokane River to the paved boat launch (this part of the Spokane River is considered part of Lake Spokane/Long Lake). The paved boat launch is just a short distance down the road from the Little Spokane River Take-Out-site. I don't try to paddle up the Spokane River to the boat launch during spring runoff or high-water times of the year because the Spokane River can be near impossible to paddle up during this time.

Fishing limits and restrictions apply as specified by current fish and game regulations. In addition, park rules don't allow fishing from the banks of the Little Spokane River so one can only fish from a non-motorized water craft such as a kayak, drift boat (without electric motor), canoe, or raft. No part of your body is allowed to be in the water so using float tubes with fins is not allowed. Fish species that make this river their home include salmon, trout, carp, catfish, bass, and perch.

Little Spokane River Rules
1. No swimming or any part of one's body can be in the water. No air mattresses or inner-tubes are allowed. Canoes, kayaks, and rafts.
ONLY.
2. No motorized craft are allowed including electric motors (an electric motor is obviously a motor).
3. No alcoholic beverages are allowed.
4. No pets allowed.
6. No disturbing the wildlife!
7. No fishing from shore. Fishing allowed from non-motorized craft only.
8. No Littering! Pack it in, Pack it Out.
9. No hunting.
10. No Camp fires.
11. No horses.
12. No bicycles.
13. No off road vehicles...
14. Wear your life jacket at all times.
15. All Persons regardless of Age SHALL wear a Lifejacket while on moving water! Moving water shall be the Little Spokane River and Spokane River from the Washington/Idaho State Line to the Centennial Trail Bridge at Plants Ferry Park and the City of West Spokane west to the Nine Miles Public Launch. Per Spokane County Ordinance 6.03.020. If you do not know where these sections of the river are just wear a Lifejacket while on any part of the river, which is a good safe practice regardless.
16. A Washington Discover Pass is REQUIRED in vehicles parking at Little Spokane River access sites, including the St. George’s Put-in and the Highway 291 takeout.
17. Attention the Little Spokane River is legally a non-navigable river even though its technically totally navigable. This means the river above or upstream of the Little Spokane River Natural Area Preserve can not be legally accessed by the public unless the river passed through federal/state/county/public land.

Info: Contact Park Rangers (http://www.riversidestatepark.org) about any issue that may affect the park and safety of visitors. Visit River Side State Park for all info related to this river such as closures, sweepers, river flow, etc.
CAUTION: This river is often called a slow moving river. This is true in the summer, but during spring run off the river can move quite rapidly. Caution should be observed anytime you are on a river or stream. Be especially cautious during spring run off when rivers are much more swift and new fallen tress can block the river; low branches can sweep you off your craft (called sweepers), and cold water also presents potential danger.

Access the Little Spokane River/Directions:  From I-90 at Spokane, WA take the Division Street exit and drive north across the bridge and up the hill to Francis Ave. Turn left at Francis Ave. and follow it west until it ends and turns into Highway 291. Follow State Route 291 North past Rutter Parkway Road and Nine Mile Falls. A mile past Rutter Parkway Road is the turn off for the take-out-site area on N. Shoemaker Ln. (there will be a boat launch sign). Follow this road until you come to the park near a creek with rapids; this is the place. This take-out-site is before you get to the Spokane River paved boat launch area. Leave a car here and go back to Rutter Parkway Road. Follow Rutter Parkway Road east until it intersects Indian Trail Road, then turn left (north) onto this road. The first put-in site is just over the bridge. The second put-in site is past the next bridge up W St. Georges Road.

 RIVER ACCESS POINTS

1. St. George Put-In
The first access site is via the parking lot just after you cross the bridge. The portage trail to the river is out the back of the parking lot (If you start to drive up the hill after the bridge you've gone too far). There is an outhouse with some informative signs at this parking area. When launching from here it is about a 3.5 mile trip down the river to the take-out-site near the Spokane River.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Large gravel parking lot; PATHS/TRAILS... Wide grassy, dirt, sand path to water. Can be access by those using wheelchairs, etc. but at wet times of the year can be hard to navigate due to mud. Once at the river's edge beware of mud at access point and swift water; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One fully accessible restroom; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One non-motorized put-in/launch; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices at waters edge. See Paths/Trails info above; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... No; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Mud; Terrain: Level to about 3% grade; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degree. River currents can be swift and cold most of the year; Environmental Conditions: Hot temperatures in the summer. Watch out for sweep trees and bushes along the river bank; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas in city of Spokane.


2. Indian Painted Rock Put-In
The 2nd and last put-in-site is after the next (2nd) bridge. As you come to this bridge the road changes names to Waikiki Road. After the bridge, turn right/west onto W St. Georges Road. Before the end of this road where the school is located you will see a sign and gravel road to the Little Spokane River put-in-site. The access site to the river is well defined and wide. There are restrooms and info signs here with no running water. Its about a 7 mile trip down the river to the take-out-site near the Spokane River.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Large gravel parking lot in same place as the trail to Indian Painted Rocks; PATHS/TRAILS... Narrow dirt and sand trail to water. Can not be accessed by those using wheelchairs, etc. Trail is real muddying during the wet times of the year. Once at the river's edge beware of mud at access point and swift water; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One fully accessible restroom; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One non-motorized put-in/launch; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... No; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Mud; Terrain: Level to about 3% grade; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degree. River currents can be swift and cold most of the year; Environmental Conditions: Hot temperatures in the summer. Watch out for sweep trees and bushes along the river bank; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas in city of Spokane.


3. Take-Out and Put-In Site

ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Large gravel parking lot; PATHS/TRAILS... Wide grassy, dirt, sand path to water. Can be access by those using wheelchairs, etc. but at wet times of the year can be hard to navigate due to mud. Once at the river's edge beware of mud at access point and swift water; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One fully accessible restroom; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One non-motorized put-in/launch; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices at waters edge. See Paths/Trails info above; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... No; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Mud; Terrain: Level to about 3% grade; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degree. River currents can be swift and cold most of the year; Environmental Conditions: Hot temperatures in the summer. Watch out for sweep trees and bushes along the river bank; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas in city of Spokane.

Monday, June 20, 2022

Channeled Scablands Adventure

Plan your summer adventure in the Channeled Scablands area aboard your Hobie Mirage Tandem Island or aboard another small watercraft.

The Inland NW Sailors will be planning a trip on the Potholes Reservoir (Friday) and then into the Potholes Canal through the Chain Lakes (Sat) sometime in August 2022 (TBA on funtosail calendar). This trip is only suitable for Hobie Islands or Kayaks or similar craft. Someone could navigate the canal with a small light weight sailing dinghy as long as you can row it, lower the mast easily, and portage it. The current will be flowing with us, not against us. For more info visit our Club page and make a comment at the bottom of the Club Page or Email Us at accesstooutdoors@gmail.com for information about this trip.

The following article shows what one could expect in sailing/kayaking in the Channeled Scablands of Eastern Washington state USA. This article is written about such a trip in Sept of 2010.

By Miles Moore, Sept. 29th 2010

In the heart of the Columbia Basin in Eastern Washington is a boating paradise of lakes, rivers, and canals that few places in the world can rival. This majesty is known specifically as the Drumheller Channeled Scablands. Up until 1951 the area was an arid waste land with very little ability to support life. With creation of the Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Project (starting with the Grand Coulee Dam and associated canals) all that changed. Some lakes in this area were created as wider spots in the canals or via large and small dams, but many others were unplanned, created by the seepage of water through the basalt.

As part of my work to develop an Inland NW Lakes & River Guide for my funtosail.com website, I found that it might be possible to experience a 45 mile adventure of sorts beginning at the northern most boat launch on Moses Lake, crossing the dike out of the lake, continuing on through Potholes Reservoir, and then paddling down the Potholes canal through the small chain lakes to the town of Othello, WA.

So on September 24th after careful study of the area I loaded up my Hobie Tandem Island (TI) and invited one of my 15 year old twin sons to do the trip with me (turns 16 in Oct.). Of course, his youthful energy and endurance would not hurt in speeding our trip as well. :)

Day 1

We started our trip at 12:20 PM. The Moses Lake portion of the trip was peaceful and uneventful. At the south end of the lake, we lowered our mast to pass under the I-90 Bridge, then headed to the dike that separates Moses Lake from the Potholes Reservoir. At this dike there are twin spill ways with associated channels; I call them the Devry and Dausen Channels. The northern most spill way is the easiest to get around creating the Devry Channel. On the Moses Lake side of the dike is a paved path to the water's edge with a fenced fishing platform. Next to this platform is where we removed the TI from the water at 3:42 PM. 

We put the TI on the dolly and walked it up the path (that dolly is worth its weight in gold!) across the gravel road and down the path below the spill way. When entering the channel on the north side there is a rocky but gradual path to the water's edge but on the south side the path is sandy and narrow with a muddy shore. Unfortunately, the shoreline below the spill way is littered with garbage which distracts from the beauty. However, once we started down the channel a short distance, we didn't see any more garbage and the environment was once again very vibrant with frogs, turtles, lots of fish, and many waterfowl species.

This time of year the water level is very low, and one must stay in the channel to not go around. We found that there was a 2 mile area just before entering the open water of the reservoir where the depth was only about 4-6 inches of water... there is no channel; we had to walk the TI through this area. Oddly, with a young man just turning 16, it wasn't a bad experience, but rather an adventure instead. :)

As the sun set we turned southwest toward MarDon Resort (mardonresort.com), our resting place. We chose MarDon Resort rather than the near-by State Park because we wanted to sleep in a nice bed versus in a tent, and because the MarDon Resort owners and employees know the area well and give plenty of info to contribute to enjoying the area. As we approached the marina, my son found himself very annoyed by 3 lights from a distance. Why? Because it seemed to him that the harder we peddled toward it, the further away the lights appeared. It was like the lights were teasing him with a snooty “catch us if you can.” When you are tired things tend to annoy you. Finally at 8:29 pm we docked at the marina and made our way to our motel room... a very welcome sight!

Day 2

The following morning we woke up to the sound of rain (darn), but there was wind so that was good news. At 11:04 am the rain stopped, and we left the dock sailing along the dam to the boat launch. The wind allowed us to sail on a beam reach almost all the way to the launch. A few times one of our amas/hulls almost went under water when a gust of wind hit the sail; but never did the TI feel unstable. We were hitting speeds of 9-10 knots, so we got across the reservoir rather quickly.

Once at the launch we pulled the TI up the launch (which was longer than normal due to the low water level) and walked about a mile to the Potholes Canal access site recommended by Mike Meseberg, the owner of MarDon Resort and a local hunting and fishing guide. The access site is a three-sided concrete wall built into the dike that extends away from the canal creating a nice eddy. We totally took the TI apart and unloaded all the gear to make the TI center hull as light as possible. I attached a rope through the rear scupper holes and belayed the TI 30 feet to the water's edge while my son guided it. Once in the water we assembled it and started our trip down the canal.

A few hundred feet down this canal is the Soda Lake Road Bridge about 12’ off the water; thankfully our 19' tall mast was very easy to lower and it only took a minute. This portion of the canal is about a mile long with walls of about 20 to 40 feet high and no place to get out of the canal the whole way until almost to the lake. Near the lake the canal narrowed slightly with a faster current; overall the canal averaged about 20-30 feet wide. The first lake in the chain lake series is the 2 mile long Soda Lake, the biggest of the lakes we would pass through this day. We sailed the whole lake with winds of 8-12 knots. This lake has a two gravel launches, one restroom at the one campground.

At the southeastern end of Soda Lake is a small dam, our next and final spot to portage around. We arrived at this dam at 2:42 pm. It’s important to stay away from the dam due to extreme currents. The best place to land and go around the dam is on the north side just at the entrance to the of the canal to the dam. I cannot stress enough not to enter the short canal to the dam as the currents in there can be really strong and very dangerous to anyone who gets caught in there... STAY OUT! It’s a bit rough for those using dolly’s to move their craft as we did as there is sage brush along the dirt trail that can slow your progress. This time we portaged the TI fully assembled down about a 10-foot bank into the water and were off again.

This portion of the canal with its 2 small lakes is a little over 2 miles long and the most impressive segment of the canal due to its much higher cliffs of about 40 to 90 feet high and some river like features. We enjoyed the Great Blue Herons (GBH) along this canal, particularly the white GBH that seemed to lead us down the canal.

About a mile after the dam is the very small Elbow Lake, followed by the slightly larger Pillar Lake; they seem more like wider sections of the same canal. After these small lakes you enter the canal again. We finally entered Long Lake, a narrow mile long lake and did some more fast sailing. This lake has a primitive launch and two restrooms with places to camp (no camping allowed on the west shore). We sailed past some beautiful white pelicans on our way out.

In the canal after long lake is a bridge (Sheep Lakes Road bridge) to pass under that was at this time of year about 15’ off the water. This portion of the canal is the widest with sections of about 40’ to 60’ wide and the canal is over a mile long.

The next lakes we entered is the mile long Crescent Lake followed by a short canal and then enter the half mile long Lower Crescent Lake. There is no shore access to these lakes for vehicles, so these lakes are the most remote of the lakes with majestic canyon walls and wind-swept hills.

The final section of the canal leaving Lower Crescent Lake to Othello is about 6.5 miles long. The walls along this part of the Canal are steep but not like cliffs in the other sections of this canal that we passed through.

The wind was funneling straight down the canal. For most human powered craft this would have been an issue; but since the TI has a sail, we were able to sail up the canal. We sailed close hauled with the windward telltale not quite flowing so we could point a little higher. With the amount of wind, we had we were clipping along at about 4 knots. However, we were tacking about every 5 to 9 seconds. We did not mind the tacking as the break the sailing gave us from peddling into the wind was very welcomed. About 3 miles into the canal is a little muddy bay we named Otter Bay because of the Otters we were privileged to see there.

We only stopped in Otter Bay for about 15 minutes before heading out again. A mile or so after Otter Bay we passed under the West Mcmanamon Road Bridge where we had to lower our mast again to pass under. Less than a mile after the bridge there is a steel framed non-vehicle bridge, high enough that we were able to pass under.

The final bridge at W Main Street in Othello is where we finished our trip at 6:37 pm. It is important to note you must not pass to the other side of the bridge, as right next to the bridge and downstream is a pipe crossing the canal with several more right after that. These pipes that cross the canal can be potentially dangerous when high speed currents are present. Under the bridge is a nice packed dirt take-out site. We unloaded our gear and then portaged the TI in pieces up the steep bank to the road. In all, this second day trip took us 7 hours and 33 minutes. In the end, navigating the various bodies of waters and canal sections; the choice of watercraft; and my physically powerful son together proved a very successful combination. This was also an extremely bonding experience for my son and I. In total we pedaled, paddled, sailed, and pulled and walked our TI for a total of 45 miles.

For more info about this trip and other inland nw lakes and rivers email Miles Moore at accesstooutdoors@gmail.com

Sunday, June 19, 2022

Inland NW Sailing and Kiting

This year in the Inland NW, Pacific NW, and Northern Mountain States we have seen consistent heavy rains resulting in Yellowstone National Park being closed due to destroyed roads and bridges, etc. In the Coeur d'Alene Idaho/Spokane WA area records has been set for the coolest weather and most rain for spring and early Summer.

The good news is this coming week weather is predicted to be in the 70's and the following week in the 80's so it appears summer is finally here.

So, with that predicted weather the Inland NW Sailor plan to do some consistent sailing on Hayden Lake, a cruise/camp on Priest Lake, Idaho in July along with a Kite flying activity at Broadmore Park in Hayden Idaho also in July. We will be posting a notice about both of these events here and on our calendar. STAY TUNED!

 

SailGP Chicago 2022

SailGP came to Chicago for the first time on June 18-19 and was also the first time the F50's have raced on fresh water. The result was the same as many races before with Tom Slingsby and his all-Australia team winning again. Canada with their Australian skipper/driver Phil Robertson came in 2nd with great results throughout the weekend of racing, followed closely by Great Britain, with it's full British team skippered by Sir Ben Ainslie.

What many are wondering is what in the world is going on with team USA skippered by Jimmy Spithill. They finished 8th overall and never seemed to get good starts or good overall speed, etc. If they cannot get their better results, there certainly will be changes on that team.

Chicago turned out to be an ideal location for racing with its near shore stadium racing and large enthusiastic crowd. SailGP will certainly return in 2023.

If you missed the racing watch here...

 

 

Sunday, May 29, 2022

Memorial Day

I thought it was only fitting I supply you with this article about honoring those that have fallen in war to keep us free. See Article Below!

And I personally would like to thank those who USA military family members have paid the ultimate sacrifice to keep us free, not just in this country but also for the world. There is no greater love than to give your life for another!

May we all remember their sacrifices today and forever. Let us visit their graves, support gold star families, and help lift where we stand, in our communities. Let us always stand, put our hands over our hearts, and take off our hats for the national anthem. And let us remember to defend the US Constitution at all costs via voting for those who know and uphold it, and by getting involved in our local communities. To truly honor the fallen is to uphold that which they fought and died for.

And to add to this, today is to specifically day to remember our fallen US military members and no one else!

Have a wonderful Memorial Day!

Skipper Miles Moore


MEMORIAL ARTICLE by the Navy SEAL who killed Usama bin Laden

Don't wish me a happy Memorial Day

Don’t wish me a happy Memorial Day. There is nothing happy about the loss of the brave men and women of our armed forces who died in combat defending America. Memorial Day is not a celebration.

Memorial Day is a time for reflection, pause, remembrance and thanksgiving for patriots who gave up their own lives to protect the lives and freedom of us all – including the freedom of generations long gone and generations yet unborn. We owe the fallen a debt so enormous that it can never be repaid.

Memorial Day is a time to honor the lives of those who would rather die than take a knee when our national anthem is played. But they will fight and die for the rights of those who kneel.

This holiday is a time to think of young lives cut short, of wives and husbands turned into widows and widowers, of children growing up without a father or mother, of parents burying their children.

Memorial Day is a time to think of might have beens that never were. Of brave Americans who put their country before themselves. Without these heroes, America would not be America.

Unfortunately, for many Americans this solemn holiday might as well be called Summer Day – marking the unofficial start of the season of barbecues, days at the beach, time spent on baseball fields and golf courses, hiking and enjoying the great the outdoors. All those things are great – we all appreciate them and they are some of the best things in life.

But Memorial Day is not Summer Day. Nor was the holiday created as a way to promote sales of cars, furniture or clothes.

Another Memorial Day brings with it a whole lot more than the start of summer. Since last Memorial Day, grass is now growing above the final resting places of many young men and women whose lives were taken too soon while defending our country in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and other far-off places many Americans have rarely heard of.

When Army Sgt. La David Johnson, Staff Sgt. Bryan Black, Sgt. 1st Class Jeremiah Johnson and Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright were killed last October in an ISIS ambush in Niger, many Americans asked: We have troops in Niger? These unknown soldiers lost their lives protecting you – every one of you reading these words.   

Think about this: Millions of high-school seniors are walking across auditorium stages this season, receiving their diplomas. Most will go on to college or jobs, but some will choose a career of military service, joining the second generation of American warriors fighting in the Global War on Terror – a war that began with the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks that took the lives of almost 3,000 people in our homeland.

Most of these new recruits – who were not even born or who were just infants when the 9/11 attacks took place – will make it home just fine. But some will not. I pray that I am wrong, but the sad truth is that the number of American war dead on Memorial Day in 2019 will be higher than it is on this Memorial Day.  

On Memorial Day, I salute my brothers and sisters-in-arms who have served beside me in War on Terror. My heart especially goes out to the families of those who did not return home. In fact, I think about all those who served and those who have given their lives fighting for America from our county’s earliest days in the Revolutionary War. They all have my gratitude.

We think we are strong, but in war any of us can be turned into just a memory in an instant. And war seems to have been the universal experience of just about every society on the planet at one time or another, for as long as there have been human societies.

How do we stop the wars resulting in such tragic waste of lives? How do we stop the number of American war dead and war dead in other nations from growing? I wish I knew the answer. But battle lines are being drawn and redrawn, and wars and terrorist attacks just keep going on and on. Weapons are getting bigger. Bombs are becoming smarter and more lives are being lost every day all over the world, leading to more death, more anger and more war.

Some are so loyal to their cause that they strap bombs on their bodies or fly passenger jets into buildings. They conduct beheadings. They set prisoners on fire. How do we find common ground with them? Do we even try to find common ground, or do we finally take the gloves off and start landing punches intended to take our enemy out for good?

I’ve been on over 400 Army combat missions and have seen more war than most Americans. More than I care to remember, but cannot forget. There is never a shortage of war. War spreads faster than fire and like fire it leaves destruction in its wake.

It hurts my heart as an American every time I see another service member’s body being brought home draped in an American flag. But it hurts my heart as a human being with every act of war we are all unleashing against each other around the world.

This Memorial Day, I urge all Americans to remember all the fallen sailors, soldiers, airmen, Marines and Coast Guard members who have so bravely served our country, as well as their families.

And I urge all Americans to join me in the hope and prayer that somehow, someday people around the world will focus more on our similarities than our differences and that we will move closer to a time when war is just a memory – part of our past but not our future.




Robert O'Neill is a Fox News contributor and ex-Navy SEAL best known as “the man who killed Usama bin Laden.” O'Neill joined the Navy in 1996 and deployed as a SEAL more than a dozen times, participating in more than 400 combat missions across four different theaters of war.

Tuesday, May 17, 2022

National Safe Boating Event

 

Come to out to our event and receive a free Life Jacket (availability limited), sign up for a safe boating class, and check out the Sheriff Boats, Sailboats, Kayaks, etc.


 
 


Remember National Wear Your Lifejacket to Work Day is Friday May 20th, 2022. When people ask you why you are wearing a Life Jacket you can tell them it's to bring awareness of the importance of wearing one to stay alive.

LEARN ABOUT SAFE BOATING AT THIS ANNUAL EVENT AND THROUGHOUT THE YEAR VIA NOTICES AT FUNTOSAIL.COM & SHERIFF MARINE DEPARTMENTS! THIS EVENT IS ATTENDED BY KOOTENAI AND SPOKANE SHERIFF MARINE DEPARTMENTS, US COAST GUARD, ACCESS TO OUTDOORS, AND INLAND NW MARINE BUSINESSES. 

SUPPORT SAFE BOATING IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST BY BECOMING A SPONSOR/DONOR &/OR VOLUNTEER. Email us at accesstooutdoors@gmail.com to learn more. Funding in particular helps support our many marine projects.

Current Sponsors... Kootenai County Sheriff Marne Division; Idaho Parks and Rec; Access To Outdoors; Inland Northwest Sailors; FunToSAIL; Fins & Feathers Tackle Shop; Black Sheep

Learn about the many great places to boat within the Inland NW at the LakeS Guide via this link... Lakes Guide



2022 Hayden Kite Festival

Annual Hayden Idaho Kite Festival 

LOCATION: Boardmoore Park, Hayden, Idaho USA; DATE: 5-21-2022; REGISTRATION: 12:00 2:30 p.m. Do not have to register to fly your kite during this event but if you want to win an award registration is required; AWARDS: 2:15 p.m; Free and fun for all ages! Awards and prizes for the Highest Flyer, Best Homemade, Best of Show and more! Join the local Inland NW Kiters

If you are attending this event, please make comment at the bottom of this post (not required).

Monday, May 16, 2022

SailGP Bermuda 2022

 

The new 2022/23 SailGP season started this last weekend (May 14-15) with a bang. This new season there are 10 boats instead of 8 making starts and mark rounding's certainly more exciting. With ten 50-foot foiling catamarans all trying to hit the start at the same time it made for some interesting viewing.

Team USA is in the top 5, still not keeping pace with the Australian (1st overall) and the top teams. Team Canada skippered by Phil Robertson from New Zealand showed some excellent skill getting 2nd overall, and Team Great Britian 3rd overall. I am always rooting for team USA, but they certainly need to kick it up a notch or two if they are to be seasonal final in 2023.

Here is a high light video. Visit SailGP.com to watch the full racing videos.

 

Sunday, May 8, 2022

Lower Spokane River, Stevens and Lincoln Counties, Washington

From Little Falls Dam to Lake Roosevelt/Columbia River

Lower Spokane River
Listed in this section are the river access points on the south side of the river, the non-Indian Reservation side of the river/reservoir. This 29 mile section of the river below Little Falls Dam to the Columbia River/Lake Roosevelt is know has the Spokane Arm of Lake Roosevelt. It is a popular camping and boating area primarily for power boats, house boats, and sailors. There is a short whitewater section of the river below the Little Falls Dam known by some whitewater kayakers. Below the rapids the river turns into Lake Roosevelt (Spokane Arm). Several amenities are available here including several paved launches and access points, boat fuel available at McCoy's, and Two Rivers Resort where the Spokane River empties into the Columbia River/Lake Roosevelt. The big draw on this portion of the river is Fort Spokane which includes a visitor center, historic museum, campground, launches, and other facilities. Area recently experiencing 20' Tasmanian wave created by a slide that temporarily damaged Porcupine Bay Launch and docks. Strong winds frequent the area to the liking of sailors and not so much to water skiers. Camping in this area is not only a great experience but also gives you access to Lake Roosevelt with over a 100 miles of navigate-able water. Fishing on this portion of the river is popular. The scenery is also spectacular here due in part to the high mountains. The Grand Coulee Dam creates Lake Roosevelt (reservoir) and the water from this reservoir backs up just 2 miles short of the Little Falls Dam. For reservoir water levels and Grand Coulee Dam information visit http://www.usbr.gov/pn/grandcoulee . For info about Lake Roosevelt recreation, camping, etc. and Fort Spokane visit http://www.nps.gov/laro/index.htm or call 509.633.9441. For boating info and regulations visit http://www.nps.gov/laro/planyourvisit/boating.htm . Directions: State Road 25 follows along the eastern lakeshore, connecting the north district to the south via Fort Spokane and Porcupine Bay. For detailed directions see sections below.

INTERACTIVE GOOGLE MAP COMING SOON!

LINCOLN COUNTY LAUNCH AND ACCESS POINTS


1. Laughbon Landing (Lincoln County)
This little know landing is a perfect place for kayakers and fishermen with small craft to launch from. There is a gate that blocks trailer launching, but this is easy to get around by those portaging their craft to the water's edge. There is a gradual wide bank from the gravel road to the water. This site includes a pebble beach and gravel parking area in front of the gate. There is no restroom and running water. This landing is directly on the opposite side (south) of the reservoir from Blue Creek campground area. One could boat directly north from this landing to this campground. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd; N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd. Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St. Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23, then right onto S 3rd. ST/WA-23. South 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28. S 3RD ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28; Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2;. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2;.Turn left onto WA-25. Turn right onto Porcupine Bay Rd. N, Follow this road directly into the park. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel parking along road at gate. Make sure you are far enough off the road so as not to impede traffic. Do not block gate. This is a dead end road; PATHS/TRAILS... Not paved and very primitive. Bank gradually descends to the water at about 5% grade. There is a pebble/rocky beach; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… None; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… None; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... None; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Nothing unusual; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade as it descends  to the water; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and this launch site has no water around launch area. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.



2. Porcupine Bay Campground & Boat Launch (Lincoln County)
Porcupine Campground is a beautiful forested park. Amenities include a double paved launch with large parking area, docks, restrooms, running water, beaches, swim area, day use area, and tent and RV campsites. Great place to boat or fish from or head up river towards the Little Falls Dam. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd. (N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd.). Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St. Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23. Turn right onto S 3rd. ST/WA-23. (S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28, and S 3RD ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28). Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn left onto WA-25. Turn right onto Porcupine Bay Rd. N. Turn right onto Laughbon Landing Rd. N. Drive to the end of this road. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA. Then follow the directions.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Large paved park lot, with designed accessible and trailer parking spaces; PATHS/TRAILS... Several paved paths to beach and launch area; There is a large sandy beach; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… Fully accessible restrooms and picnic area, drinking water; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… Three docks, two on either side of the double lane launch, and one at near launch for those staying at the park; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices. With assistance one utilizing a wheelchair could get to the water at the beach, depending on water level; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Tent and RV camping; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Nothing unusual; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade at launches; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down so beach access is an issue. Due to the length of the powerboat launch pad there typically is water at the end of the launch pad. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.



3. Fort Spokane Launches and Campground, Lincoln County
 Fort Spokane is a popular camping and boating area. Visit the historic Fort Spokane museum for rich history of this area. Fort Spokane Campground, includes RV & tents sites, boat launch, docks, beautiful beaches, swim area, restrooms, shaded picnic areas, and hiking trails. One can trailer launch at the paved boat launch off of HWY 25 on the north side of the park (will see signed indicating a boat launch) or portage launch a non-motorized watercraft off the large beach in the day use area, or in the camping area via two gravel/dirt trails to the beach area where there are 3 small docks. Across the bridge from this park are the Twin River Casino, marina & launch, motel, store, and RV park. The opposite side of the river from Fort Spokane is the Spokane Indian Reservation. You could boat from this location for weeks and not see all of Lake Roosevelt and the Spokane arm of this reservoir. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd (N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd). Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St. Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23. Turn right onto S 3rd. ST/WA-23. (S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28. S 3RD, and ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28). Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn left onto WA-25. At the sign indicating the boat launch facility (you will see a large parking lot to your left) turn right to go to the boat launch or left to go to the sandy beaches and swim area.  Welcome to Fort Spokane State Park. Maps: To view a map click on google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA.  Info: For info about Lake Roosevelt recreation, camping, etc. and Fort Spokane go to http://www.nps.gov/laro/index.htm or call 509.633.9441. For boating info and regulations visit http://www.nps.gov/laro/planyourvisit/boating.htm
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Large paved park lots, with designed accessible and trailer parking spaces; PATHS/TRAILS... Several paved and hard packed gravel paths to the launch beaches. At powerboat launch there there is a paved route to the launch dock. Trails to the beaches are level to about 4% grades. Route path to powerboat launch dock is about 5% grade; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… Fully accessible restrooms at powerboat launch and beach launch areas. There are accessible picnic areas, drinking water, etc.; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… Four docks, one at powerboat launch, and three at camping area beach launches; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices. With assistance one utilizing a wheelchair could get to the water at the beach, depending on water level; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Tent and RV camping; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Nothing unusual. Lots of sand, dust, and mud during the rainy season; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade at launches; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down so beach access is an issue. Due to the length of the powerboat launch pad there typically is water at the end of the launch pad. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.



Highway 25 Spokane River Bridge (Lincoln and Stevens Counties). Between Fort Spokane State Park & Twin Rivers Resort/Casino

4. Detillion, 5. Ponderosa, 6. Crystal Cove (see map above. Lincoln County):
All three of these river side campsites are boat in only. NOTICE: If someone tells you Detillion campsite (located east from the Fort Spokane Launch/Park) can be accessed via vehicle, they are incorrect. Access to Detillion is blocked by a private ranch. This is a boat in only site.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Park at Fort Spokane State Park Boat Launch facility; PATHS/TRAILS... Designed path to boat launch dock. At riverside campsites there are primitive trails from the water to the campsites. Any trails are sandy/dirt combo. Not considered accessible for wheeled mobility devices; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… None; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One dock and double lane paved boat launch at Fort Spokane S.P.. No docks at riverside campsites; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Primitive camping at designated riverside campsites. Most of these campsites are in wooded areas with shade; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 3% grades; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and these beach sites can be difficult to get up to from the water. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.



SPOKANE INDIAN RESERVATION / STEVENS COUNTY LAUNCHES AND ACCESS
The Spokane Indian Reservation has quite a few public river access sites as well as sites available only to the Spokane Indian Reservation members. Listed here are only those sites that are open to the general public. Availability of these sites to the public can vary from year to year based on the Indian Reservations current polices, etc. Visit the Spokane Indian Tribe website at http://www.spokanetribe.com to confirm if the site you are interested in is open. Typically all river access sites listed here are open to the public; We take no responsibility if a site is closes without closure indicated here. This 29 mile section of the river from below Little Falls Dam to the Columbia River/Lake Roosevelt is know has the Spokane Arm of Lake Roosevelt. It is a popular camping and boating area primarily for power boats, house boats, and sailors. There is a small whitewater section of the river below the Little Falls Dam which is known by some whitewater kayakers. Below the rapids the river turns into part of Lake Roosevelt with several paved launches and access points. Boat fuel is available at either McCoy's Resort or Two Rivers Resort on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The big draws on the Spokane Indian Reservation along the river are the Two Rivers Casino and the many sandy beaches at the various public access points. Strong winds frequent the area to the liking of sailors and not so much to water skiers. Camping in this area is a great experience and gives one access to Lake Roosevelt with over 100 miles of navigate-able water. Fishing on this portion of the river is popular (as is the rest of  the Spokane River). The scenery is spectacular due in part to the high mountains along the river. Info: The Wellpinit School District on the Spokane Indian Tribe reservation has some good info at http://www.wellpinit.wednet.edu


1. Wynecoop Access
Wynecoop Access point is less than 2 miles below the dam. This is the only river access point below the Little Falls Dam before it slows and turns into a reservoir. It has an old paved launch that can be difficult to use because of the mound of dirt and rock in front of it. Be advised that if you could back at trailer down this launch this ramp drops off abruptly and you could potentially drop your trailer wheels off the pad and get stuck. However next to this ramp is a primitive gravel launch that gradually descends into the river and is much better suited for launching. There are no restrooms or running water, and camping is not allowed. The road to this river launch is to the left before the sign on road that says "No Trespassing, This is not a public road. Strictly Enforced." This site is regularly used by the locals. The gravel road nearest the sign is a private drive. Directions: Traveling north or south on HWY 231 when you are near the Spokane River turn left onto Little Falls Rd. E. When this road descends to the Spokane River and you proceed past Little Falls Dam, turn left onto Wynecoop-Cayuse Mtn Rd. Follow this road to where a sign says "No Trespassing, This is not a public road. Strictly Enforced." Turn left on the second gravel road prior to reaching the sign (you can see the sign from the gravel road) and on the other side of the road from the sign. The gravel road nearest the sign and across the street is a private residence road. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA. Follow the directions to Fort Spokane, then continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel parking next to either the gravel or cement launch. Do not block launches or road two and from these sites. This is a dead end road; PATHS/TRAILS... None; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… None; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One paved and one gravel launch; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... None; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Nothing unusual; Terrain: Level to about 7% grade as it descends to the water; H2O/Water: Water normally clear. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river levels via Little Falls Dam up river. At late fall and during the winter the river is drawn down and these launch site have little water to launch into launch. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.


 
2. Blue Creek Access & Bay
Blue Creek Campground is posted as a tribal campground only, but many non-tribal members camp here. Contact the Spokane Indian Tribe about the current status of this site for non-tribal members. This location is particularly known as the area that kayaker like to camp at before going up river toward the Little Falls Dam. Porcupine Campground across the river/reservoir is a good alternative campsite but can be very congested during the summer. This site has only a few shaded locations to camp at unless you drive further up the dirt road and then hike a little into the trees in the gulch. There is no formal launch so one launches non-motorized watercrafts off the banks/sandy beaches. This creek has created one of the few bays on this section of the river/reservoir where one can anchor a boat to get out of the main channel from boats and bad weather. There is a large level grassy area to play sports, Frisbee, etc. on. Restrooms are poorly maintained and are not wheelchair accessible. Be advised that the Blue Creek Rd., which leads down to the river/reservoir, dead ends at the bay area, and does not lead back to the main road as indicated on most maps. Also this road is very steep but less so than the other campground roads in this area. Unfortunately the dirt road has a lot of ruts and loose rocks that make the trip down to the river/reservoir a bit difficult. If you are pulling a trailer it's best to have a vehicle with 4x4 that has the power to go up 6% grades with areas of sand, loose small boulders and rock, and gravel. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd (N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo R); Turn Left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St; Turn Right onto S 3rd St./WA-23; Turn Right onto S 3rd (ST/WA-23. S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28. S 3RD) (ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28); Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2; Continue to follow US-2; Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2; Continue to follow US-2; Turn Left onto (HWY) WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and continue up the hill toward Fruitland & Kettle Falls. Turn right onto Peters Rd. stay on this road until it T's into West-end Rd. Turn right onto West-end Rd. On this road keep an eye out for the wood sign that says Blue Creek Campground (Sign indicates this site is only for tribal members, so again contact the tribe for the current status of this site). As you pass the sign continue on down the road to the river/reservoir. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps  and type Fort Spokane, WA. Follow the directions to Fort Spokane, then continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.

ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel and dirt parking areas in the fields; PATHS/TRAILS... None; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One poorly maintained and not accessible to wheeled mobility devices. We advice you bring your own porta-potty; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… None; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Primitive camping in open field, with only a few trees; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Nothing unusual. Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade descending into the water; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.


3. Raccoon Cove & 4. Maggie Shoup's Access

5. No Name Access

6. Sand Creek Access
All these campgrounds have sandy beaches but none of them have a boat launch. Raccoon Cove is furthest northwest then in succession going southeast is Maggie Shoup's, then No Name, and last Sandy Beach. Raccoon Cove is spot that is most scenic with its rock formations and is nestled in a canon like location. It's also a more popular spot to swim due to the more protected nature of the cove. There is one dock at the No Name campground and a swim dock/platform at Raccoon Cove. At these sites there are many spots where one can tent or RV camp (no hook ups). There are shaded and non-shaded camping areas. Restrooms are poorly maintained and are not wheelchair accessible. Be advised that the roads that lead down to the river/reservoir are very steep. If you are pulling a trailer its best to have a vehicle with 4x4 that has the power to go up 6% grades with areas of sand and loose gravel. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west on this road. Turn Right onto N Hills Rd; N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd; Turn Left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St; Turn Right onto S 3rd St./WA-23; Turn Right onto S 3rd; ST/WA-23. S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28. S 3RD ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28; Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2; Continue to follow US-2; Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2; Continue to follow US-2; Turn Left onto (HWY) WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and continue up the hill toward Fruitland & Kettle Falls. Turn right onto Peters Rd. stay on this road until it T's into West-end Rd. Turn right onto West-end Rd. On this road keep an eye out for the one wood sign that says Campground, Chief Three Mountain, Raccoon Cove, Maggie Shoupe, No Name (Sandy Creek is not on the sign). As you pass the sign and the road curves to the left stay left and continue on down the hill. Raccoon Cove and Maggie Shoup's is on a dirty road to the left has you go down the hill, and No Name and Sandy Creek are further down the dirt road as you pass the dirty road to Raccoon Cove. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA. US. Then follow the directions to Fort Spokane, then continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel and dirt parking areas along dirt/sand road way; PATHS/TRAILS... None. Any trails are sandy; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One poorly maintained and not accessible to wheeled mobility devices. We advice you bring your own porta-potty. Several covered picnic/camping sites; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One dock and one swim platform. Launch from beach; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Primitive camping along reservoir, with only a few trees; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade descending into the water. Dirty roads down from the main paved road of Peters Rd. are extremely steep at time of 7% or more; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and these launch/beach sites can be difficult to get down to the water. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.


7. Chief Three Mountains Access

8. Chief Three Mountains Access
This camp area has no launch but does have extensive beautiful sandy beaches. At this site there are many spots where one can tent or RV camp (no hook ups). There are shaded and non-shaded camping areas. Restrooms are poorly maintained and are not wheelchair accessible. Be advised that the roads that lead down to the river/reservoir are very steep at 7% grade or so. If you are pulling a trailer it's best to have a vehicle with 4x4 that has the power to go up 7% grades with areas of sand and loose gravel. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn Right onto N Hills Rd (N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd); Turn Left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St; Turn Right onto S 3rd St./WA-23; Turn Right onto S 3rd (ST/WA-23. S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28). (S 3RD ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28); Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2; Continue to follow US-2; Turn Right onto Morgan St/US-2; Continue to follow US-2; Turn Left onto (HWY) WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and continue up the hill toward Fruitland & Kettle Falls. Turn right onto Peters Rd. stay on this road until it T's into West-end Rd. Turn right onto West-end Rd. On this road keep an eye out for the one wood sign that says Campgrounds, Hidden Beach, Hole in the Wall, Horeshoe Point, & Spokane River. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA. US. Then follow the directions to Fort Spokane, then continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel and dirt parking areas along dirt/sand road way; PATHS/TRAILS... None. Any trails are sandy; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One poorly maintained and not accessible to wheeled mobility devices. We advice you bring your own porta-potty. Several covered picnic/camping sites; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… None. Launch from beach; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Primitive camping along reservoir, with only a few trees; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade descending into the water. Dirty roads down from the main paved road of Peters Rd. are extremely steep at time of 7% or more; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and these launch/beach sites can be difficult to get down to the water. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.



9. Spokane River Beach Access
10. Hidden Beach
11. Hidden Beach & Dock Access
Lower Spokane River/Reservoir Beach Access campground and Hidden Beaches campground are connected from northwest to southeast with one long sandy beach No official launch, beach launching. There is one dock at the southeast end of Hidden Beach. At this site there are many shaded and non-shaded areas where one can tent or RV camp (no hook ups). Restrooms are poorly maintained and are not wheelchair accessible. Be advised that the roads that lead down to the river/reservoir are very steep. If you are pulling a trailer it's best to have a vehicle with 4x4 that has the power to go up 7% grades with areas of sand and loose gravel. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd heading west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd. North Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd. Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St. Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23. (S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28.) Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn left onto (HWY) WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and continue up the hill toward Fruitland & Kettle Falls. Turn right onto Peters Rd. Stay on this road until it T's into West-end Rd. Turn right onto West-end Rd. On this road keep an eye out for the wood sign that says Campgrounds, Hidden Beach, Hole in the Wall, Horeshoe Point, & Spokane River. Maps: To view a map click on the following link http://www.mapquest.com and type Fort Spokane, WA., then follow the directions to Fort Spokane. Continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel and dirt parking areas along dirt/sand road way; PATHS/TRAILS... None. Any trails are sandy; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One poorly maintained and not accessible to wheeled mobility devices. We advice you bring your own porta-potty. Several covered picnic/camping sites; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One dock. Launch from beach; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Primitive camping along reservoir, with only a few trees; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade descending into the water. Dirty roads down from the main paved road of Peters Rd. are extremely steep at time of 7% or more; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and these launch/beach sites can be difficult to get down to the water. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.




12. Cornelius Campground & LaunchAt Cornelius primitive campground there is a primitive boat launch suitable for small lightweight powerboats, etc. This is the only launch on the Spokane arm of Lake Roosevelt along the Spokane Indian Reservation. At this site there are many spots where one can tent or RV camp. There are both shaded and non-shaded camping areas. Restrooms are poorly maintained and are not wheelchair accessible. There are beautiful sandy beaches ideal for sunbathing and other activities. Be advised that the roads that lead down to the river/reservoir are very steep. If you are pulling a trailer it's best to have a vehicle with 4x4 that has the power to go up 7% grades with areas of sand and loose gravel. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd; N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd. Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St.Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23. Turn right onto S 3rd; ST/WA-23. S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28. S 3RD ST/WA-23 becomes WA-28. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn left onto (HWY) WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and continue up the hill toward Fruitland & Kettle Falls. Turn right onto Peters Rd.. Stay on this road until it T's into West-end Rd. Turn right onto West-end Rd. On this road keep an eye out for the wood Cornelius Campground sign. Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA. US. Follow the directions to Fort Spokane, then continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel and dirt parking areas along dirt/sand road way; PATHS/TRAILS... None. Any trails are sandy; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… One poorly maintained and not accessible to wheeled mobility devices. We advice you bring your own porta-potty. Several covered picnic/camping sites; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… No docks. One sandy launch suitable only for light weight boats; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Primitive camping along reservoir, with only a few trees; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade descending into the water. Dirty roads down from the main paved road of Peters Rd. are extremely steep at time of 7% or more; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and these launch/beach sites can be difficult to get down to the water. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at and around Two Rivers Casino and Resort.


 
13. McCoys Resort
This seasonal resort on the Spokane Indian Tribe Reservation is open from Memorial Day to Labor day (if open at all). Besides Two Rivers Resort this is the only place on the Spokane River portion of Lake Roosevelt with fuel for boats (if open). There is a small store, day use area, and beach. This site has docks, beach, shaded area, restrooms, running water, and picnic area. No formal launch. Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west on this road. Turn Right onto N Hills Rd. N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd. Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St. Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23. Turn right onto S 3rd (ST/WA-23. S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28). Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn left onto (HWY) WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and continue up the hill toward Fruitland & Kettle Falls. Turn right onto Peters Rd. Stay on this road for almost 5 miles. On the right side of road 631/Mccoy Marina Rd, you will see a wood sign indicating McCoys Resort. This sign is right after the Pierre Point Campground sign (a private water side camp area for tribe members only). Maps: To view a map click on the following link http://www.mapquest.com and type Fort Spokane, WA. Follow the directions to Fort Spokane, then continue on across the river/bridge and continue to follow the directions as indicated above.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Gravel and dirt parking area at store; PATHS/TRAILS... None. Open walking spaces around the store and to beach are dirt and sandy; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… Non accessible restroom in store (only available if open); SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… One dock and beach to launch from; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... None; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Lots of sand; Terrain: Level to about 5% grade descending into the water. Dirty roads down from the main paved road of Peters Rd. are steep at time of 5%; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down and this beach sites can be difficult to get down to the water. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Snakes, drinks, and gas at at this store otherwise one must go to Two Rivers Casino and Resort.

14. Two Rivers Resort, Marina, & Launch
15. Two Rivers Resort Beach
Two Rivers Resort on the Spokane Indian Reservation is the only marina on lower Spokane River/Reservoir (part of Lake Roosevelt). With 660 miles of shoreline where the Spokane and Columbia Rivers meet, it's an ideal place for water skiing, wake boarding, boating, sailing, fishing or just lounging on the beach. One million visitors per year can't be wrong. The Resort has 101 RV sites and 32 tent sites with beautiful views of Lake Roosevelt and Spokane River Reservoir. All RV sites are full hook-ups equipped with a barbecue, picnic table, and patio. In addition there are restrooms, showers, laundry facilities, pavilion, day use areas, playgrounds, and dump station. Call 509.722.5500 for more information or send an email to vacations@two-rivers-casino.com for reservation information. Visit their website at http://www.two-rivers-casino.com Directions: From I90 near Ritzville WA. take Exit 232 on E. Danekas Rd going west. Turn right onto N Hills Rd. (N Hills Rd. becomes Harrington Tokyo Rd.). Turn left onto WA-23/E Sherlock St. Turn right onto S 3rd St./WA-23 (S 3rd St./WA-23 becomes WA-28.) Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn right onto Morgan St/US-2. Continue to follow US-2. Turn left onto WA-25. Cross the HWY 25 bridge and once across the resort is to your left (easy to see). Maps: To view a map click on the following link google.com/maps and type Fort Spokane, WA., then follow the directions for Fort Spokane. Directly across the river/bridge is the resort on the map.
ACCESSIBILITY: PARKING... Large paved park lots, with designed accessible and trailer parking spaces; PATHS/TRAILS... Several paved and hard packed gravel paths to the launch and beaches. At powerboat launch there there is a paved route to the launch dock. Trails to the beaches are level to about 4% grades. Route path to powerboat launch dock is about 5% grade; RESTROOMS/FACILITIES… Fully accessible restrooms at powerboat launch and beach launch areas. There are accessible picnic areas, drinking water, etc.; SENSORY... No sensory tactile markers for those with visual and other impairments. DOCKS/LAUNCHES/PLATFORMS… Marine and dock at launch. No dock at beach area; DIRECT WATER ACCESS… No access for wheeled mobility devices. With assistance one utilizing a wheelchair could get to the water at the beach, depending on water level; TRANSFER SYSTEMS... None; CAMPING... Tent and RV camping with hook ups; O.T.H.E.R… Oddities/Barriers: Nothing unusual; Terrain: Level to about 5% grades; H2O/Water: Water normally murky. Water temperature in the summer can be around 60 to 70 degrees. Extreme current can develop in this area. Beware of sudden increases in river/reservoir levels via Dam up river or down the end of the reservoir at Grand Coulee Dam. At late fall and during the winter the reservoir is drawn down so beach access is an issue. Due to the length of the powerboat launch pad there typically is water at the end of the launch pad. River like conditions at times; Environmental Conditions: Nothing unusual. River like conditions in early spring and late fall; Resources: Food, drinks, and gas at Two Rivers Casino and Resort facilities.

This page was posted on June 21, 2009, updated on Oct 25, 2016, updated 5-8-2022.

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